Angebote zu "Future" (9 Treffer)

Martin Gordon - Thanks For All The Fish (CD)
16,95 € *
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(Radiant Future Records) 15 Tracks - Former Sparks and Radio Stars bassist Martin Gordon returns with his eighth solo album! Martin has worked with the Rolling Stones, Primal Scream, Blur, Boy George and Kylie Minogue. This album continues his own brand of guitar-driven pop with a dark, yet still melodic, edge. Targets include Brexiteers (‘Idiots’) and Donald Trump!

Anbieter: Bear Family Recor...
Stand: 22.06.2019
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Chester Atkins - Guitar Blues - Brown Eyes A´Cr...
12,95 € *
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(2017/Modern Harmonic) 2 tracks, Blue Vinyl Celebrate the birth of a major recording career- with Chester ´Chet´ Atkins’ debut single! Chet (then Chester) recorded ´Guitar Blues´ in 1946, at the young age of 22. Here, Chester tells us a story of through 2 minutes and 53 seconds of rhythmic thumb-picking melodies, a playful chorus by Dutch McMillin on clarinet, and harmonized twin-guitar leads with Roy Lanham. Chester also delivers a solo worthy of his idol, Les Paul. ´Brown Eyes A’Cryin’ in the Rain´ was penned by Bullet Records’ co-owner (and future Oak Ridge Boy) Wally Fowler, and Curly Kinsey. Featuring a vocal by Jack Shook and Dutch McMillin on clarinet handling the main solo, Chester fills in the space behind the singer and wraps up the ending in signature snappy fashion. Modern Harmonic is proud to present Chet’s first record, reissued for the first time- and on blue vinyl!

Anbieter: Bear Family Recor...
Stand: 07.06.2019
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Various - She-Boom, She-Boom - African-American...
14,95 € *
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(2000/Westside) 18 tracks booklet. African-American Influences On Reggae 1963-73 She-Boon She-Boom ´The Big Beat Keeps You Rocking On Your Feet´... ...And it came to pass that the American Rhythm & Blues of the 1950s and early 1960s begat reggae. Well, almost . Before Jamaica´s national music - and its most outstanding world export - became ´reggae´, it inevitably passed through several stages of metamorphosis. First there was the shuffle. the island´s own individualistic representation of the sounds that beamed daily and nightly from clear-channel R&B stations in America´s deep south - stations that could be heard the length and breadth of Jamaica when good weather conditions prevailed - and over massive sound systems at blues dances island-wide. The whole Ja. music industry that we know today stems from the shuffle, which was initially created to satiate demand for this style after the American R&B scene had moved on and away from it. Eventually the shuffle evolved into Ska, itself still influenced to a degree by the pre-Soul music of Black America. And as US R&B ultimately moved to the backburner to let Soul take over in the mid 60s, so Ska gave way first to soul-influenced rock steady and, eventually, to reggae - but those R&B influences never totally left Jamaican music. as you´re about to find out if you´ve bought this compact disc... To complement its two volumes of reggae versions of soul originals. ´The Music Got Soul´ (WESA 847) and ´The Music Got Mo´ Soul´ (WESA 848), Westside´s compilers-that-be now present a dozen and a half tracks which all have their musical origins in the aforementioned pre-Soul era but which successfully adapted to a Jamaican treatment. Presented in a chronology approximate to their original release date (these versions. not the US originals), they show how important American R&B was to the evolution of what we now know as reggae. Few would dispute this writer´s assertion that you couldn´t have had one without the other... Several of the acts featured herein actually started their careers in this pre-Soul era. Thus it´s entirely appropriate that the oldest song to feature. Joan Whitney and Alex Kramer´s ´Ain´t Nobody Here But Us Chickens´ -originally recorded by, and a # 1 R&B, # 6 Pop hit for, the great Louis Jordan in early 1947 - should be performed by the one of the first Jamaican artists to record locally. Lascelles Perkins made his debut recordings in the mid 1950s for Clement ´Coxsone´ Dodd. 20 years before his amusing version of ´Chickens´ (complete with speeded-up, Chipmunk like backing vocals by ´The Chicks´) hit the racks in mid-1974. An old-fashioned crooner with a distinct Nat ´King´ Cole influence. Perkins had been only semi-active as a recording artist for some years prior to this recording - but was still singing in the early 80s. when he cut a version of another Whitney/Kramer song much beloved by Jamaican singers. ´No Man Is An Island´. for his brother-in-law Dodd´s Studio One imprint. Another of those who was ´there at the start´ was Derrick Harriott, and it´s Derrick who provides us with the earliest recording on this CD. A more than capable tenor with a distinctive, melodic falsetto, Harriott had not long departed his colleagues in the Jiving Juniors to begin a lengthy career as a solo when he cut his own. slow-soul version of Donnie Elbert´s ´What Can I Do´ (De Luxe. 1958). The song had been a big ´end-of-night´ closer for sound systems for years. Derrick interspersed the verses of ´What Can I Do´ with a recitation that he had borrowed from ´All I Could Do Was Cry Part Two´. an early. torrid performance by future soul star Joe Tex (Anna Records 1959). To round the whole thing out he also threw in a snippet of Wilson Pickett´s then-current. breakthrough hit ´It´s Too Late´ (Double L. 1963) and the mixture came out perfectly, as you´ll hear here. Harriott did not confine his interest in Elbert´s catalogue to ´What Can I Do´ - he cut the man´s uptempo jiver ´Leona´ as the flip of ´The Wedding´ - nor his interest in medleys to this record. In 1969, just as rock steady was turning into reggae, he blended the choruses of the Pastels´ Been So Long´ (Hull. 1957) with the verses of the Tams´ 1964 ABC-Paramount recording of ´You Lied To Your Daddy´ to forge the churning. exciting version featured here. All in all. Harriott recorded more than a dozen Tams tunes, among them ´Standing In´, ´Laugh It Off´. ´Close To Mn´, ´Do I Worry´. ´Walk The Streets (a.k.a ´You Might As

Anbieter: Bear Family Recor...
Stand: 22.06.2019
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Various - Ve Day - The Vocalists (CD)
16,95 € *
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(Empress) 25 tracks. original recordings Just picture the scene. The British people are celebrating VE day with a will. Throughout the country people are gathering together for street parties, pubs and bars are packed with revellers while the length and breadth of London´s Whitehall is thronged with an enormous crowd eager to slake its collective thirst, then to acclaim one of the great heroes of the hour - the Prime Minister, Winston Churchill... for he is due to speak to the mass of people who have joy in their hearts and a song in their throats. It makes for a most stirring occasion. The conflict in Europe is over, although everyone is aware that the years ahead will not be easy. Just for this one particular day they can forget their worries and enjoy one of the great days in their country´s history. Music is playing everywhere. Songs of hope, songs of sentiment; some with words looking forward to a bright future, others with a reflective backwards glance to the bitter-sweet emotions of the six long years of strife. It was a marvellous period for music. Great songs were still being written for vocalists fully capable of doing them complete justice. On both sides of the Atlantic the pre-war boom in swing and dance bands had evaporated to some extent; it was the singers who ruled in the brave new world. Vera Lynn had begun her professional career as a band vocalist, but by the early ´forties had established herself as one of the most popular solo artists in Britain. The deep sincerity of her finely tuned singing together with the memorable numbers she performed struck a chord at home and with the troops overseas. Her connection with the forces during the war has passed into the nation´s folklore. Of all the singers active between 1939 and 1945 it is Dame Vera who will forever be associated with those dark days; her records form a soundtrack to the war years. It is a tribute to Vera Lynn that her popularity has never waned, enduring to the present day more than fifty years after she recorded her big wartime hits. There´s A New World, It Could Happen To You and Jerome Kern´s beautiful Long Ago And Far Away will stir many memories. Her closest rival for the affections of the people was the much-missed Anne Shelton. When she started with Ambrose´s Orchestra as a gym-slipped schoolgirl it was hard to believe that a voice of such deep port wine resonance could come from one so young. Her sense of how to phrase and shape a song would have been considered extraordinary in an experienced artist, let alone someone only just into her teens. She was so highly regarded that, on trips to war-torn England, both Glenn Miller and Bing Crosby expressly asked her to work with them. A tremendous honour for a comparative newcomer. Just how well merited it was is demonstrated in Tonight I Kissed You and one of the only numbers to become popular in both Britain and Germany, Lili Marlene. There were other popular female vocalists besides the ´big two´. Adelaide Hall must have been one of America´s best-ever exports to the UK. Initially a wonderful jazz singer who made some classic recordings with Duke Ellington, she became an integral part of the British music scene when she moved to this country. Versatility and a fine voice coupled with a highly distinctive style were the keys to her success. Equally at home with the popular songs of the time as with mainstream jazz, her versions of the massive worldwide Julie Styne/Sammy Cahn hit It´s Been A Long Long Time and Harold Rome´s My Heart Sings are perfect vehicles for her exemplary singing. In both she is accompanied by the equally adept Norman Perry at the piano. Just like Anne Shelton the pint-sized Beryl Davis was a very young girl with a very big voice. Her teenaged assurance in I Got It Bad is a reminder of an all-round vocalist who recorded with jazz violin maestro Stephane Grappelli and with David Rose in America as well as a number of dance bands...

Anbieter: Bear Family Recor...
Stand: 22.06.2019
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Various - Sun Country Collection - Memphis Ramb...
24,95 € *
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(1990/Rhino) At Sun Records on 706 Union Avenue in Memphis, wild rockabilly and polite country were part of the same continuum, as surely as Saturday nights rolled into Sunday mornings. In either category, genius producer Sam Phillips invariably sought out un-encumbered, passionate, plainly stated perform-ances. He wanted a mood to establish itself the second a song began and then intensify and ignite. Phillips´ Nashville contemporaries were adding scads of strings and busloads of back-up singers to sweeten songs for the uptown crowd, but Phillips sensed that frankness was gaining an edge over forced sophistication. Phillips arrived at this method partly by ingenuity and partly by necessity—after all, fewer musicians on a session meant fewer people to pay. But from the start, Phillips was also searching for something novel. Phillips, an Alabaman, moved to Memphis in 1944 for a disk jockey spot at WREC. In 1949 and 1950, he put together a makeshift recording studio in what was previously a Union Avenue radiator shop. In his first step toward greatness, Phillips began record-ing local performers and leasing the witty, angular sides to labels like Chess and Modern. By the end of 1951, thanks to the success of Jackie Brenston´s rock ´n´ roll forerunner ´Rocket 887 Phillips was able to quit WREC and concentrate on building his own label, Sun Records. With vital blues and R&B performers like Rufus Thomas, Howlin´ Wolf, and Junior Parker in his stable, Phillips over-saw the finest electric blues from outside Chicago being made at the time. Phillips´ breakthrough approach, unquenched emotion drenched in echo, resulted in a tidal wave of raw, early recordings that still startle. Yet Phillips´ ambitions ranged beyond what he heard in the blues, and the natural next step for him was to find the points of intersection between the blues and country and western. Many of the lasting performers on Sun Country Volume One are singer/guitarists without full-blown bands. Most of the recordings are based around voice and acoustic six-string, and in some cases that´s the whole arrangement: Howard Seratt´s ´Make Room In The Lifeboat For Me,´ country gospel worthy of the dread-drenched Louvin Brothers, features only the haunted singer´s guitar and harmonica. Even on uptempo tunes, Phillips saw to it that drums were used sparingly, the idea was to flip convention and let the song drive the band. Because there were fewer players to shift around, Phillips and his flock could experiment with different treatments of the same tune. Radically dissimilar takes of Warren Smith´s ´So Long I´m Gone´ serve as bookends to Sun Country Volume One and go a long way toward telling the grand story of how country spawned rockabilly. The words are the same in both Charlie Feathers but the attitudes couldn´t be farther apart. Smith is best known as a post-Presley rocker (his raucous calling cards are ´Rock And Roll Ruby´ and the tasteless ´Ubangi Stomp´), but the country take of ´So Long I´m Gone´ that kicks off this set fore-shadows his move into straight C&W after he left Sun. On this slow version, Smith collapses into regret, missing the occasional guitar strum, mortified that he has to leave his philandering lover. The fast rockabilly variation that slams this record shut is triumphant, the sound of a hardened man deter-mined to beat adversity. He´s out the door, he´s bound for glory. The fast ´So Long I´m Gone´ sounds like freedom. Throughout Sun Country Volume One are land-marks of Sam Phillips´ move from invigorating standard country forms to exploring a new type of country he helped invent. A key part of the journey takes place during ´My Rind Of Carryin´ On:´ recorded by future insurance salesman Doug Poindexter and the Starlite Wranglers. The Wranglers were legend-ary Elvis accomplices Scotty Moore on guitar and Bill Black on bass, the duo had already begun rehearsing with Presley when this was recorded in May 1954. Poindexter isn´t much of a singer (his delivery makes it seem as if he was unaware of the lyrics´ risque innuendoes), but we can hear the seeds of Moore´s imminent breakthrough with Presley in his brief solo bursts. It´s history, to be sure, but it´s also ferocious in its own right. Sun Country Volume One is full of these magical moments, none of which have appeared on any previous Rhino collection. (Completists may wish to discover Bear Family´s massive The Sun Country Years 11-LP box set, which tells the whole story.) Sun´s big names are

Anbieter: Bear Family Recor...
Stand: 20.07.2019
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Maurizio Maiotti - 1944 -1963 - I Complessi Mus...
89,00 € *
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Limitiert auf 1000 Stück, 4,3 Kg, 840 Seiten, 24 x 28 x 6 cm, Englisch und Italienisch The idea for this project came about several years ago, in the late 1990s, triggered by a passionate devotion for this forgotten world. The ini-tial plan was to cover only the present groups that perform rock´n´roll, beat and the western sound but soon the urge to go back in time super-seded the first intention and so the search was widened to the postwar years. Hence I came across musicians like Paolo Tomelleri, Bruno De Filippi, Gerry Bruno, Raf Montrasio, and from there on it was just like working on an assembly line that led me to many more-or-less known artists who at the time were the delight of nightclub patrons. This is the fruit of that widened search, the aim being the re-discovery of the magic early Sixties through the costumes, instruments, and the artists´ personal history. I have included a substantial discography (never compiled befo-re), along with a filmography, a handy bibliography, and a small selection of letters written by the musicians themselves. This project was also conceived as a fitting, long overdue tribute to all those musicians who have backed many famous artists without any credits at all, who were eclipsed by the leading artist but who all the same were crucial for the latter´s success. Just think of Marino Marini´s band, newcomer Mina´s, Fred Buscaglione´s Asternovas, Piero Giorgetti´s, Riz Samaritano´s, Henghel Gualdi´s musicians and plenty others. The journey doesn´t stop here, just as the music didn´t stop in 1964. The second leg will take us directly in the midst of the Beat era. A third volume, focusing on the Italian revival from the early Eighties to the present day, will hopefully bring our trip to an end. Note: I couldn´t fully complete this music period for want of information regarding many a group. Information and material not included in these volumes are most welcome. In order to complete the second volume in this series, I would like to encourage all those who have a history with a band or bands between 1963 and 1970 to get in touch and share their photographs or other material which could be appropriate for publication. For my personal archive, I am also interested in photos, postcards, discs and other material related to groups from the `50s and `60s to set up a music archive that may facilitate research for other books in the future. These volumes could become a valuable starting point for educational studies, historical research and exhibitions that may well serve as a means to rediscover the golden age of nightclubs, when the music was performed live and the orchestras were a major attraction for young people. Maurizio Maiotti L´idea di realizzare questo volume nasce diversi anni fa, verso la fine degli anni ´90, spinta dalla grande passione per questo mondo dimenticato. L´inizio del progetto era legato solo ai gruppi attuali che proponevano rock´n´roll, beat e il western sound. Ma ben presto lo stimolo di andare indietro nel tempo sovrasta la prima intenzione e così le ricerche si allargano fino a tornare nel lontano dopoguer-ra. Sono così entrato in contatto con alcuni musicisti tra cui Paolo Tomelleri, Bruno De Filippi, Gerry Bruno e Raf Montrasio e da qui è stata come una catena di montaggio che mi ha portato a conoscere numerosi altri artisti oggi più o meno noti che all´epoca dilettava-no il pubblico sul palco di night famosi. Pertanto il lavoro si è allargato e questo ne è il risultato. Ho voluto farvi così scoprire la magia dei primi anni 60 attraverso i costumi, gli strumenti e la storia dei musicisti. Ho voluto presentavi una discografia corposa, una traccia importante fino ad oggi mai proposta, accompagnata da una filmografia, una bibliografia utile e una piccola sezione di lettere scritte dai musicisti stessi. L´intento di questo lavoro è anche quello di dare finalmente merito a coloro che hanno accompagnato tanti artisti famo-si senza però ottenere grandi riconoscimenti, musicisti oscurati dalla figura del proprio cantante ma pur sempre importanti ed essenziali per il successo di quest´ultimo. Parliamo ad esempio del complesso di Marino Marini, quello della esordiente Mina, gli Asternovas di Fred Buscaglione, i musicisti di Piero Giorgetti, di Riz Samaritano, di Henghel Gualdi e tanti altri. Ma il percorso non si ferma qui, la musica non si è fermata nel 1964 e quindi il cammino prosegue e vi do appuntamento col secondo volume che ci porterà in piena era beat. Nel

Anbieter: Bear Family Recor...
Stand: 19.02.2019
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Elvis Presley - Lost On Tour (LP)
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(1989/Bilko) 8 tracks - Unreleased studio recordings - The unique recordings presented here for the very first time were made on March 30, 1972, one day after the end of the ´official´ recording sessions which took place on March 27-29. The March session was filmed by MGM primarily so that part of it could be included in the ON TOUR documentary, which eventually featured both `Seperate Ways´ and ´Always On My Mind´. It appears, therefore that these two songs also originated from this ´unofficial´ session. This is not so surprising, as neither Elvis nor his musicians would have enjoyed the constant buzzing of cameras while laying down the goods for future record releases. The takes featured on this new Bilko release are the result of many hours of painstaking editing. The rough unedited material originated from a MGM working tape a cue tape as it is known to insiders. On the unedited tape constant interruptions and directions from the filmdirector to his camera-crew can be heard over Elvis´ singing. Because of this several takes of the featured songs had to left lying in the cutting-room. However, what was left and fit for release in an Elvis collectors dream come true. With the exception of ´A Big Hunk 0´ Love´ all the takes presented here are without any of the distracting comments made by the filmdirector and his crew. In order to edit out all the bad parts we have sometimes had to leave out a few bars of an intro as- well. Such is the case with the piano intro to take 1 of Tor The Good Times´, which has Elvis jokingly singing ´Don´t look so bad, put on some make-up´. Before this we only had a ´live´ version, recorded at Madison Square Garden. The studio version is remarkably different! On the first take Elvis sings solo while on the next, incomplete, take Charlie Hodge joins in to sing some harmony parts. `Lead Me, Guide Me´ is very close to the version which can be heard and seen in ON TOUR. The Stamps are joined by Elvis on ´Sweet, Sweet Spi-rit´ . Elvis then sings lead vocals on the beautiful gospel song ´Nearer My God, To Thee´ , never heard performed by Elvis before! After the gospel-jam it´s time for some down to earth rock ´n roll when Elvis and the band attack ´Burning Love´ . Not as tight as the hit-single version recorded on March 28, but still a great track ending in a long ´hunka-hunka-Burning Love´ finale. From the fast-paced ´Burning Love´ it´s back to the third and final take of Tor The Good Times´ . A complete version, in which Elvis is once again accompanied by Hodge for the harmony. This is followed by Elvis fool-ing around with a few lines of the Marty Robbins Country classic ´Hi Paso´ . The final two songs on this release were performed during most of the concerts from ´72 and onwards. `A Big Hunk 0´ Love´ (take 1) is pure dynamite with James Burton show-ing once again why he is called the greatest rock ´n roll guitar picker around. Eat your heart out, Chuck! `You´re on your own Ronnie´, Elvis comments, and a heavy drum-roll introduces ´See See Rider´ , a delivery as tight as Elvis´ 68 leather suit! No horns on this take, just The Man and his band cookin´ it up! During a session-break Elvis sat down for a quiet conversation with the filmdirector and a member of the Stamps. What followed was one of the very few occasions Elvis talked about his musical roots and gospel music in particular, a fitting conclusion to a fine piece of Presleyana. The Sergeant

Anbieter: Bear Family Recor...
Stand: 07.06.2019
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Don Gibson - The Masters (CD)
14,95 €
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(1997/Eagle) 20 Classic Tracks Don Gibson Donald Eugene Gibson was born in Shelby, North Carolina on April 3rd 1928. As a child he learned to play guitar and, at fourteen, was making appearances on local radio. By 1946 he was a regular on Station WNOX in Knoxville and, as part of a trio called Sons of the Soil, made some recordings for Mercury. Gibson had been writing his own material and attracted the attention of Wesley Rose which led to a writing contract with Acuff-Rose Publishing in Nashville. On the recording side Don Gibson had spells with RCA Victor, MGM and Columbia. In 1956 his recording of his own composition ´Sweet Dreams´ reached the U.S. Billboard country chart; Faron Youngs´s version was a bigger hit, spending thirty three weeks on the best sellers. In 1957 Gibson was living in a trailer outside Knoxville. On the day his television and radio were repossessed Gibson went to the Baltimore Courts Motel and wrote the two songs that would guarantee his financial and professional future. They were ´I Can´t Stop Loving You´ and ´Oh, Lonesome Me´. By 1958 he had rejoined RCA where he was teamed with producer Chet Atkins. The pairing of ´Oh, Lonesome Me´ and ´I Can´t Stop Loving You´ were quickly issued as a single. ´Oh, Lonesome Me´ remained at Number One for eight weeks, spending thirty-four on the charts; it also crossed over to become a U.S. Billboard Pop Top Ten Hit. ´I Can´t Stop Loving You´ made the country Top Ten and spent six weeks in the pop lists. In 1962 Ray Charles topped the pop charts with ´I Can´t Stop Loving You´; the song has reputedly been recorded over six hundred times and cut by such artists as Elvis Presley, The Everly Brothers, Jerry Lee Lewis, Emmylou Harris, Tom Jones, Connie Francis and Roy Orbison. It remains an outstanding example of Gibson´s lyric art. Between 1958 and 1969 Gibson´s RCA recordings brought him forty country chart successes as well as fourteen pop entries. He relied heavily on his own compositions although, ironically, he did not write ´Sea Of Heartbreak´ (1961), his only UK Top Twenty hit. He joined Hickory in 1970, enjoying over forty more country chart entries over the next decade. Apart from solo success he scored in duet teamings with Dottie West and Sue Thompson. This collection features some of Don Gibson´s greatest work, it features his highly individual, emotional, breathy vocal style and unusual clipped phrasing. Apart from some of his own compositions you can hear his interpretations of several country classics from the pens of such luminaries as Floyd Tillman, Fred Rose and most notably, the legendary Hank Williams, one of Gibson´s own favourite songwriters. BILL WILLIAMS

Anbieter: Bear Family Recor...
Stand: 25.04.2019
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Various - The Apollo Acappella Audition Album (LP)
19,95 € *
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(Relic) 16 tracks - If you´re a longtime fan of acappella— maybe you even go back to the mid-60´s when ´I´ m In Love´ by the Velvet Angels almost became a Philly smash, and´Stormy Weather´ by the Zircons graced the N.Y. airwaves — you´re probably wondering about the contents of this album. After all, Apollo Records was a key fifties r&b label; they released great groups, blues, and gospel, but acappella? We were equally surprised to find these acappella gems—audition and rehearsal tapes— in the midst of Apollo´s long-neglected archives. It was exciting to hear a tittle-known group like the Gentlemen surface again with their haunting ´Story of a Love Gone Cold.´ It was a thrill to hear a young unknown group audition for Apollo on a tape that had been stored for over thirty years in a dusty box marked ´Avalons.´ But it was almost miraculous to find unissued acappella ver-sions by the Keynotes, Casanovas, and Dovers of some of their best songs. Harmony fans, take note! You´ll hear these songs for the first time without instrumental backing as the groups try out their future Apollo releases. Let´s begin with the Casanovas, a classy group f rom North Carolina who did six nice singles for Apollo between 1954 and 1957. Long underrated, the Casanovas were never promoted properly by Apollo, and their memorable songs languished in obscurity, except for the r&b collecting fraternity. We´vetried to remedy this neglect,thirty years later by issuing a complete LP of their Apollo sessions (including a few unreleased gems— Relic/ Apollo #5073.) ´Please Be Mine´ and´You Are MyQueen´ are my favorite Casanovas´ ballads, although their first single and biggest hit, ´That´s All,´ is also in the running. Melvin ´Mike´ Stowe sings the lead on ´You Are My Queen,´ with Willie and Frank McWilliams, Chester Mayfield, and William Samuels, who had sung with the Royal Sons, the gospel predecessors of the 5 Royales, ably back-ing him. ´Please Be Mine´ features the distinctive tones of Chester Mayfield, who probably could have been a great solo artist with the right breaks. The Casanovas´ acappella songs are from a rehearsal tape recorded in April, 1957 at a High Point, N.C. radio sta-tion, and sent by their friend, Bob Woodward, to Charles Merenstein at Apollo. Merenstein and his mother-in-law, Bess Berman, listened to the songs, and made their final choice before bringing the group to New York to record. The Keynotes´ acappella renditions of ´A Star,´ ´Suddenly,´ and ´I Don´t Know´ are from a single tape lacking either stat. sheet or date. Apollo had a small studio on its premises on the ground floor at 457 W. 45th Street in New York City, and it´s probable that these early workings of the Keynotes´ later singles were done there. Most of the Apollo sessions were recorded at nearby Beltone, Mastersound, or Bell Sound studios, so the small office studio was most likely used just for these rehearsals and auditions. It´s clear from the different alternate versions of ´I Don´t Know´ done with music that they were experimenting with the proper tempo for this great record (see our complete Keynotes´ LP, Relic/ Apollo #5072.) The beginning line ´Hello, hello again, my friends I hope we´ll meet again´ was, of course, used by the Willows on their ´56 hit, ´Church Bells May Ring,´ Since the Keynotes and Willows hung around the same 115th Street corners and playgrounds, it´s probable that this phrase was a popular street saying that was readily appropriated by the groups from that Harlem neighborhood. The original Keynotes included Floyd Adams, lead; Howard Anderson, first tenor; Roger Lee, second tenor; Larry ´Spa nky´ Carter, baritone; and Tucker Clark, bass. Since writing their story for our Keynotes´ LP, we´ve sadly learned that at least three of the original five members are dead. The Keynotes were a quintessential N.Y. street-corner group. They knew everybody in their neighborhood, and a lot of aspiring vocalists tried out their skills with them. Theirs is the familiar tragedy of the central Harlem streets; their youthful talent and vitality quickly turned to oblivion with the passing years. Fortunately, the Dovers have fared quite well since the fif-ties. Miriam Grate´s warm tones set the pace for this stylish, underrated group. Songs like´The Sentence´ and´Sweet as a Flower´ were fresh and lyrically original; the Dovers were local favorites in Harlem who never were able to attain star-dom. The first Dovers´ group consisted of: Miriam Grate, lead;

Anbieter: Bear Family Recor...
Stand: 07.06.2019
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