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Hal Leonard Rabson Ann Blues And Barrelhouse Pi...
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DescriptionAnn Rabson: Blues & Barrelhouse Piano No music reading is required for this book/DVD pack! The book covers topics such as: two-beat shuffle, box shuffle, linear boogie woogie, round boogie woogie, Yancy/Domino-inspired groove, and New Orleans-inspired

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Mel Bay Ferguson J. - All Blues For Jazz Guitar...
31,00 €
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Destined to become a classic, this book is the natural result of not only years of playing jazz guitar but also of the author´s long associations with many innovative jazz guitarists. This comprehensive guide is one of the first jazz methods to focus entirely on the blues idiom and its contribution to jazz improvisation. It is designed to help you play authoritatively in a broad spectrum of jazz guitar settings from big band to small combos to a solo context. This book is divided into 4 sections which addresses 12-bar blues progressions, 3-note Freddie Green-type chords, shuffles, swing riff comping, chord scales, linear bebop comping, modal concepts, triads over bass notes and a wealth of chord voicings and inversions. Includes over 110 music examples, 45 complete 12-bar choruses, and a CD with 30 tracks. It also offers a helpful glossary of jazz terminology. Written in standard notation and tablature.

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Advance Music Bach J.s. - Triosonate Ii In C-mo...
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Triosonate II in c-moll BWV 526Bach composed the six Trio Sonatas for Organ BWV 525 - 530 probably between 1727 and 1730 when he was Cantor at the St. Thomas Church in Leipzig. The trio sonata as a baroque genre usually employs four players: two solo parts (violin, flute or oboe), a bass part (violoncello, violone or bassoon) and the continuo part (organ, harpsichord or lute). It is assumed that during his time in Kothen (1717 - 1723), Bach composed a few dozen trio sonatas for various instruments, of which very few have survived. In fact, the Triosonata for two Flutes and Continuo BWV 1039, along with the one from the Musical Offering (which was written much later), is the only one of which the authenticity can be regarded as certain. Bach arranged it for Viola da Gamba and harpsichord (BWV 1027). The upper solo part is played by the right hand of the harpsichordist while the Viola plays the second part an octave lower. Later, Bach arranged the last movement for organ (Trio in G). Here, the pedal plays a slightly simplified bass, and the left hand takes up the second part. Maybe some of the movements of the six Trio Sonatas for Organ go back to lost compositions Bach has arranged in a similar manner. There are earlier versions of many movements, and the original of at least one movement (BWV 528, I.) was written for more than one instrument: the Sinfonia of the second part of Cantata BWV 76 which is set for Oboe d´amore, Viola da Gamba and Basso Continuo. The linear, distinctly chamber music-like disposition of the Sonatas further supports this assumption, and a number of recent recordings of the Sonatas with two solo instruments and basso continuo convincingly justify the reconstruction of a hypothetical original. The Vivace in its ritornello form (tutti/solo) rather resembles a concerto movement. A spright, homo- phonic theme in thirds (tutti) contrasts with solo interludes in which the upper voices carry on a lively debate characterized by imitations of sixteenth-note figures in the upbeats. Certainly one of the most beautiful movements of the Trio Sonatas, the Largo sounds sad and wistful, despite the key of Eb major. After a pure, almost meditative opening with sigh gestures over a cantus firmus-like melody of long sustained notes, and a walking bass, the movement subtly intensifies by means of tightly woven sixteenth notes in the solo parts, a slightly more active bass and complex thematic and motive relationships. It is hardly noticeable that the eighth notes in the bass starting in bar 24 are a simpli-fied version of the sixteenth notes from the beginning. In the Allegro, Bach combines two seemingly contradictory musical styles in an extended fugal finale. The linear, discursive theme in the traditional alla breve seems at first a little stern and sober, almost like a study in the stile antico, that had become unfashionable during Bach´s lifetime. Some of his contemporaries subsequently criticized him for incorporating this style into his music. Bach juxtaposes it with a distinctively ,modern´ second theme of rhythmic vitality with a playful countersubject. Tempo indications and solid slurs are in the autograph. In some cases, the slurs are ambiguous (esp. mvt. I. bars 44 + 45 and 52). The suggestions for arti-culation and phrasing (dashed slurs, staccato dots and commas) have been omitted in parallel passages.Nombre de pages :52

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Advance Music Bach J.s. - Triosonate Vi In G-du...
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Triosonate VI in G-Dur BWV 530Bach composed the six Trio Sonatas for Organ BWV 525 - 530 probably between 1727 and 1730 when he was Cantor at the St. Thomas Church in Leipzig. The trio sonata as a baroque genre usually employs four players: two solo parts (violin, flute or oboe), a bass part (violoncello, violone or bassoon) and the continuo part (organ, harpsichord or lute). It is assumed that during his time in Kothen (1717 - 1723), Bach composed a few dozen trio sonatas for various instruments, of which very few have survived. In fact, the Triosonata for two Flutes and Continuo BWV 1039, along with the one from the Musical Offering (which was written much later), is the only one of which the authenticity can be regarded as certain. Bach arranged it for Viola da Gamba and harpsichord (BWV 1027). The upper solo part is played by the right hand of the harpsichordist while the Viola plays the second part an octave lower. Later, Bach arranged the last movement for organ (Trio in G). Here, the pedal plays a slightly simplified bass, and the left hand takes up the second part. Maybe some of the movements of the six Trio Sonatas for Organ go back to lost compositions Bach has arranged in a similar manner. There are earlier versions of many movements, and the original of at least one movement (BWV 528, I.) was written for more than one instrument: the Sinfonia of the second part of Cantata BWV 76 which is set for Oboe d´amore, Viola da Gamba and Basso Continuo. The linear, distinctly chamber music-like disposition of the Sonatas further supports this assumption, and a number of recent recordings of the Sonatas with two solo instruments and basso continuo convincingly justify the reconstruction of a hypothetical original. The sixth Trio Sonata might be the only one that Bach explicitly composed for this collection. The particularly high number of changes in the manuscript might indicate that he was still working on it when he copied the Sonata into the collection. The first movement Vivace has a certain resemblance with the first movement of Bach´s Italian Concerto for harpsichord. It is a concerto movement, but the solo and tutti passages are often ambiguous. The unison in the beginning is unparalelled in the Trio Sonatas and emphasizes the concerto character of this movement. The first theme returns in modified forms: syncopated (bar 53), in sequence (bar 73) and embellished in minor (101). Extended arpeggios in the interludes (T 37 - 52, 85 - 100 und 137 - 152) and a remarkably active bass (bar 101) effectively contrast the homophone main theme. The declamatory character and its rhythmically and melodically independent solo parts make the Lento sound more like an aria from Bach´s cantatas with obligato (violin, flute or oboe) than a chamber sonata. There are elements of the Siciliano (esp. the dotted 6/8 rhythms) and the bass gets involved in the thematic development.Like in Sonatas BWV 526, 528, und 529 the bass is also involved in the development of the fugue subject in the last movement Allegro. While the first theme only employs one and a half bars, the second theme in the parallel minor stretches over four bars and dominates the middle section with motivic sequences and frequent modulations. Due to the range (first theme soprano) the Sonata was transposed a halfstep above the original key. For the same reason, the upper parts were switched in bars 156 - 160. The alto part was transposed an octave down in bars 21 and 22 (with two eight notes pickup). The 8va in the third movement can be performed as written.Vivace - Lente - AllegroNombre de pages :54

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Advance Music Bach J.s. - Triosonate Iv In E-mo...
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Triosonate IV in e-Moll BWV 528Bach composed the six Trio Sonatas for Organ BWV 525 - 530 probably between 1727 and 1730 when he was Cantor at the St. Thomas Church in Leipzig. The trio sonata as a baroque genre usually employs four players: two solo parts (violin, flute or oboe), a bass part (violoncello, violone or bassoon) and the continuo part (organ, harpsichord or lute). It is assumed that during his time in Kothen (1717 - 1723), Bach composed a few dozen trio sonatas for various instruments, of which very few have survived. In fact, the Triosonata for two Flutes and Continuo BWV 1039, along with the one from the Musical Offering (which was written much later), is the only one of which the authenticity can be regarded as certain. Bach arranged it for Viola da Gamba and harpsichord (BWV 1027). The upper solo part is played by the right hand of the harpsichordist while the Viola plays the second part an octave lower. Later, Bach arranged the last movement for organ (Trio in G). Here, the pedal plays a slightly simplified bass, and the left hand takes up the second part. Maybe some of the movements of the six Trio Sonatas for Organ go back to lost compositions Bach has arranged in a similar manner. There are earlier versions of many movements, and the original of at least one movement (BWV 528, I.) was written for more than one instrument: the Sinfonia of the second part of Cantata BWV 76 which is set for Oboe d´amore, Viola da Gamba and Basso Continuo. The linear, distinctly chamber music-like disposition of the Sonatas further supports this assumption, and a number of recent recordings of the Sonatas with two solo instruments and basso continuo convincingly justify the reconstruction of a hypothetical original. The first movement has an unusual form. It begins with a slow introduction - a three-part fugue exposition, with a theme apparently resembling that of the second movement. The Vivace starts on the second eighth in bar 5 and is relatively short, compared to the other sonatas. Its melodic lines are particularly driving and energetic. The fugue theme is answered in the octave, which Bach typically does in slower movements. In the Andante, a two-bar phrasing is particulary noticeable. In the first section (bars 1 - 11) the theme is answered in unison, and after a two-bar interlude the theme appears in the dominant. In the second section (bars 11 - 23) the two solo parts develop motifs from the main theme in a beautiful dialogue. The first section is repeated in e-minor without bars 1 - 7. It is followed by the second section, here shifting to G-major. While the bass has almost exclusively served as an accompaniment so far, it is actively involved in the development of the fugue theme in the last movement, Un poc´ allegro. It is dominated by a large variety of bubbly triplet figures. The form can either be perceived in three large sections (I. m 1 - 28, II. m 28 - 60, III. m 60 - 87, coda) or as a fugue-rondo with regular theme appearances. Due to the range and for better playability the sonata was transposed a halfstep above the original key. The slurs comply with the Neue Bach Ausgabe. In the manuscripts their beginnings and ends are usually difficult or impossible to determine. Suggestions are printed in dashed slurs. In the second movement the Soprano and Alto parts were exchanged in bar 38 - 40 to accomodate the Soprano´s range. The dotted six-teenth notes in the third movement have to be adjusted to the triplet rhythm.Nombre de pages :44

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Advance Music Bach J.s. - Triosonate V In C-dur...
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Triosonate V in C-Dur BWV 529for Saxophone TrioBach composed the six Trio Sonatas for Organ BWV 525 - 530 probably between 1727 and 1730 when he was Cantor at the St. Thomas Church in Leipzig. The trio sonata as a baroque genre usually employs four players: two solo parts (violin, flute or oboe), a bass part (violoncello, violone or bassoon) and the continuo part (organ, harpsichord or lute). It is assumed that during his time in Kothen (1717 - 1723), Bach composed a few dozen trio sonatas for various instruments, of which very few have survived. In fact, the Triosonata for two Flutes and Continuo BWV 1039, along with the one from the Musical Offering (which was written much later), is the only one of which the authenticity can be regarded as certain. Bach arranged it for Viola da Gamba and harpsichord (BWV 1027). The upper solo part is played by the right hand of the harpsichordist while the Viola plays the second part an octave lower. Later, Bach arranged the last movement for organ (Trio in G). Here, the pedal plays a slightly simplified bass, and the left hand takes up the second part. Maybe some of the movements of the six Trio Sonatas for Organ go back to lost compositions Bach has arranged in a similar manner. There are earlier versions of many movements, and the original of at least one movement (BWV 528, I.) was written for more than one instrument: the Sinfonia of the second part of Cantata BWV 76 which is set for Oboe d´amore, Viola da Gamba and Basso Continuo. The linear, distinctly chamber music-like disposition of the Sonatas further supports this assumption, and a number of recent recordings of the Sonatas with two solo instruments and basso continuo convincingly justify the reconstruction of a hypothetical original. Sonata V is the only one that could be considered a three movement Concerto. The first movement Allegro with its chamber music vocabulary is an excellent example for speculations that the organ sonatas might have had instrumental predecessors. Its style could easily be associated with a sonata for two flutes or two violins and continuo. The formal layout is highly complex. The three-part architecture is strictly symmetrical and this principal not only applies to smaller formal units but also to the composition of thematic material. Despite the complexity, the movement never sounds rigid or dull, the instrumental dialogue freely unfolds and melodic development is always relaxed and playful. The Largo in a-minor has a three-part Da capo aria form with elements of a fugue. The lyrical, expressive melody is answered on the fifth by the second part, while the first continues with a chromatic counter-subject. The middle section opens and closes with two slightly more playful interludes (bars 13 + 33) with the main theme in their center, this time in the parallel of C-major, avoiding chromaticism. After the Da capo the movement closes with a phrygian half cadence (IV6 - V) and leads into the last movement. In comparison with the more ,modern´ theme of the first movement, the fugue theme of the Allegro appears a bit conventional. But the motivic development and the organisation of the two-part form are not any less sophisticated. In bar 29 a new theme is introduced, that is combined with the first in the coda (bars 51 + 141). As in most of the final movements of the trio sonatas, the bass is actively involved in the development of the themes, especially in motivic sequences. Due to the range (theme of the first movement in the Alto part) the sonata was transposed a halfstep above the original key. This also allows playing the bass line with a baritone saxophone without low A. Olaf Muhlenhardt, December 2008Nombre de pages :68

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Advance Music Bach J.s. - Triosonate Iii In D-m...
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Triosonate III in d-moll BWV 527 BWV 527Bach composed the six Trio Sonatas for Organ BWV 525 - 530 probably between 1727 and 1730 when he was Cantor at the St. Thomas Church in Leipzig. The trio sonata as a baroque genre usually employs four players: two solo parts (violin, flute or oboe), a bass part (violoncello, violone or bassoon) and the continuo part (organ, harpsichord or lute). It is assumed that during his time in Kothen (1717 - 1723), Bach composed a few dozen trio sonatas for various instruments, of which very few have survived. In fact, the Triosonata for two Flutes and Continuo BWV 1039, along with the one from the Musical Offering (which was written much later), is the only one of which the authenticity can be regarded as certain. Bach arranged it for Viola da Gamba and harpsichord (BWV 1027). The upper solo part is played by the right hand of the harpsichordist while the Viola plays the second part an octave lower. Later, Bach arranged the last movement for organ (Trio in G). Here, the pedal plays a slightly simplified bass, and the left hand takes up the second part. Maybe some of the movements of the six Trio Sonatas for Organ go back to lost compositions Bach has arranged in a similar manner. There are earlier versions of many movements, and the original of at least one movement (BWV 528, I.) was written for more than one instrument: the Sinfonia of the second part of Cantata BWV 76 which is set for Oboe d´amore, Viola da Gamba and Basso Continuo. The linear, distinctly chamber music-like disposition of the Sonatas further supports this assumption, and a number of recent recordings of the Sonatas with two solo instruments and basso continuo convincingly justify the reconstruction of a hypothetical original. The Andante has three parts. The first begins with a fugue over a continuo-bass. In the second part a new theme appears in measure 49, and Bach develops earlier motives in a total of nine sequences. The triplet motif from measure 21 extends into long, animated strings. A repetition of the first part closes the movement. The second movement Adagio e dolce also appears as the middle movement of the Triple Concerto for Flute, Violin and Harpsichord in C, BWV 1044 which was probably written after the version for organ. Two contrasting themes, one homophone, the other in imitation dominate the first part. In the second part, new ideas are presented in two bar sequence. The Vivace shows elements of a da-capo-fugue - just like the final movements of the Trio Sonatas BWV 526, 529 und 539. But here, the bass is not involved in the thematic development. The form A-B-A prominently resembles the first movement. Triplets are a consistent element of this sonata. In the extended middle section (M 37 - 144) of the third movement they are much more playful and freely varied and sometimes even overlap the development of the main theme. In the third movement the Soprano and Alto parts had to be exchanged in bars 17 - 24 and 161 - 168 to accommodate the instruments´ ranges.Nombre de pages :56

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Hal Leonard Mick Goodrick & Tim Miller - Creati...
24,70 €
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DescriptionMake advanced guitar harmonies more intuitive and effective. This inventive approach to imagining and organizing notes will expand your concept of guitar harmony.You will be able to organize and use tensions more easily and with greater expression, whether you are soloing, playing in a rhythm section, or in a solo guitar context. Practical etudes over popular chord changes will help you to understand and apply these new theoretical concepts.The accompanying recording includes examples and play-along tracks, featuring innovative guitarists Mick Goodrick and Tim Miller, along with an all-star rhythm section featuring Terri Lyne Carrington on drums and John Lockwood on bass.You will learn to: develop and apply new chord voicings, using a rich palette of notes; isolate and organize the most essential notes of any chord-scale (Generic Modality Compression); view chord scales as five families of 3-note chords: triads, sus4, clusters, 7th no 3, and 7th no 5), to be used systematically and simultaneously; leverage this chord-scale organization to lead you to inventive harmonies; incorporate tensions more intuitively into your comping and lead lines; and use new arpeggio patterns in linear improvisation.More Product DetailsPublished on 09/03/2012Format Instrumental TutorLength 98 pagesLanguage EnglishPublisher Berklee PressCatalogue # HL50449613

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Roland Dp603-pw
2.939,00 €
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Sound Generator Klavierklang Klaviersound: SuperNATURAL Piano Modeling Max. Polyfonie Piano: Limitless (Solo-Spiel mit Piano-Kategorien) Andere: 384 Töne 307 Töne Tastatur PHA-50 Tastatur: Holz und Kunststoff Hybrid Struktur, mit Hemmung und Ebenholz / Elfenbein Feel (88 Tasten) Pedale Dämpfer (fähig zur kontinuierlichen Erkennung) Soft (fähig zur kontinuierlichen Erkennung) Sostenuto (Funktion zuweisbar) Lautsprechersystem -Lautsprecher 12 cm (4 3/4 Zoll) × 2 Nennleistung 30 W x 2 Lautstärke (SPL) 108 dB (Dieser Wert wurde nach der Methode gemessen, die auf Rolands technischem Standard basiert.) Kopfhörer Effekt: Kopfhörer 3D Ambiente Stimmen, Stimmen Berührungsempfindlichkeit Key Touch: 100 Arten, feste Berührung Master-Tuning 415,3 - 466,2 Hz (einstellbar in Schritten von 0,1 Hz) Temperament 10 Typen (Gleich, Dur, Moll, Pythagoräer, Kirnberger I, Kirnberger II, Kirnberger III, Meantone, Werckmeister, Arabisch), wählbarer Temperamentschlüssel Auswirkungen Ambiente, Brillanz Klavier-Designer Deckel Key Off Lärm Hammer Lärm Duplexskala String Resonance in voller Auflösung Dämpferresonanz Key-Off-Resonanz Kabinettsresonanz Resonanzbodentyp Dämpfergeräusch Einzelnes Noten-Tuning Einzelnes Notenvolumen Einzelnes Notenzeichen Interne Lieder US: Insgesamt 363 Songs Sonstiges: Insgesamt 353 Songs Datenwiedergabe Wiedergabe Standard-MIDI-Dateien (Format 0, 1) Audiodatei (WAV, 44,1 kHz, lineares 16-Bit-Format, USB-Flash-Speicher erforderlich) Recorder Aufzeichnung Standard-MIDI-Dateien (Format 0, 3 Teile, ca. 70.000 Notenspeicher) Audiodatei (WAV, 44,1 kHz, lineares 16-Bit-Format, USB-Flash-Speicher erforderlich) Bluetooth Audio: Bluetooth Ver 3.0 (Unterstützt SCMS-T-Inhaltsschutz) MIDI, Drehen Musikblatt: Bluetooth Ver 4.0 Andere Funktionen Metronom (einstellbar Tempo / Beat / Down Beat / Pattern / Lautstärke / Tone) Anmeldung TwinPiano (mit Einzelmodus) Transpose (in Halbtönen) Lautsprecherlautstärke und Kopfhörerlautstärke wählen automatisch die Funktion aus Volumenbegrenzungsfunktion Bedienfeldsperre Automatisch aus Andere Anzeige Grafisches LCD 132 x 32 Punkte Anschlüsse Gleichstromeingang Eingangsbuchsen: Stereo-Miniatur-Telefon-Typ Ausgangsbuchsen (L / Mono, R): 1/4-Zoll-Telefontyp USB Computeranschluss: USB B-Typ USB-Speicheranschluss: USB-A-Typ Phones-Buchse x 2: Stereo-Miniatur-Telefon-Typ, Stereo-1/4-Zoll-Telefon-Typ Energieversorgung AC-Adapter Energieverbrauch 9 W. Abmessungen (einschließlich Klavierständer) (mit Deckel schließen) 1,398 (W) × 311 (D) × 783 (H) mm 55-1 / 16 (W) × 12-1 / 4 (D) × 30-13 / 16 (H) Zoll (mit geöffnetem Deckel) 1,398 (W) × 377 (D) × 975 (H) mm 55-1 / 16 (W) × 14-13 / 16 (D) × 38-3 / 8 (H) Zoll * Messungen beinhalten angebrachte Stabilisatorkomponenten. Gewicht (einschließlich Klavierständer) DP603-CB: 45,9 kg, 101 lbs 7 oz DP603-PE: 47,0 kg, 103 lbs 22 oz DP603-PW: 47,8 kg, 105 lbs 13 oz Zubehör Bedienungsanleitung Broschüre "Standmontage" Broschüre "SICHERES GEBRAUCH DES GERÄTS" Roland Klassische Klavier Meisterwerke Roland Piano Arrange Collections "Lassen Sie uns Klavier genießen" AC-Adapter Netzkabel Stabilisator Kopfhörer-Haken Kabelklemmen Option (separat erhältlich) Kopfhörer USB Flash Speicher (* 1) * 1 Verwenden Sie den von Roland verkauften USB-Flash-Speicher. Wir können den Betrieb nicht garantieren, wenn andere Produkte verwendet werden.

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